Cognitive Behavioural Couple's Therapy

What is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

CBT looks at how you interpret the things that happen in your life, through your thinking (cognitions) and how you act (behaviours). 

 

In times of discomfort we look for patterns in your thinking and actions that may be accidentally working against you, rather than for you. 

 

By identifying these vicious cycles we can then start to apply different CBT tools, adapted to your own circumstances, to allow you to build on your strengths and find strategies that help you to break the cycle.

CBT prides itself on building the skills within you to become your own therapist

 

Once a skill is learned, it is often possible to adapt these to new circumstances on your own, helping you to build upon your ability to cope without therapy in the future.

How does CBCT differ from Individual CBT

Cognitive Behavioural Couples Therapy (or CBCT for short) works specifically on ‘Couple Distress’.

 

This distress can take many forms from anything from outward hostility to complete withdrawal. 

 

In CBCT you will work together with your therapist to understand:

 

  • Your individual needs and motivations in your relationship

  • Times where your actions to gain these things may be backfiring or leading to misunderstandings

  • The strengths that you each bring to your partnership and ways in which these may be currently blocked or misdirected

 

You will then work using evidenced based tools and techniques such as:

 

  • Developing helpful  behaviours designed to rebalance the positives and negatives in your relationship

  • Learn and Practice effective listening and communication methods

  • Problem Solve as a team to allow you to navigate the challenges and changes you face in your relationship

Let's Talk.

Ock Street Clinic, 45 Ock Street, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 5AG

Tel: 01865 522626 or 07806667888

Email: info@goodthinkingtherapies.co.uk

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